There is no better way of seeing the bigger picture than going back to one’s roots. If you find yourself lost, go back to where you started. Assassin’s Creed Origins takes this concept into heart and take it’s followers back to the beginning of things. Origins, as the name suggests, dives into ancient Egyptian times somewhat between the prequel and the sequel, something which is unlike its predecessors where the map will be taking place either during the late Medieval or Post-Renaissance period. I mean, it made sense in the previous games since the main objectives of the game are most enjoyed by taking a view on top of skyscraper buildings and performing some breathe taking wall climbing. Thus, for the game developers to take a bold move and place the game in a world where the tallest walls are barely more than four stories shows how much trust they have in their creativity. Initially, before laying my eyes on the game, it had already been speculated that the game will take a new route that would place the game on new heights. I had my doubts since I was already bogged by the previous versions of the game which seemed more of a repetition than anything else.

Assassin’s Creed Origins has changed compared to its predecessors. However, despite the change, you still get to defeat political chicanery by stealth. By far, this is the biggest connected map to be played in Assassin’s Creed. With soft sands making a desert mountainous view, as Bayek, you get to explore it while attempting to complete your main mission. The first thing that impressed me when playing the story is that everything is connected. Although Bayek (who is by far my favorite among the previously used assassins due to his humor and troubled background) has got one big target, he gets to do other missions along the way, unlike the previous Creed games where you would be obliged to move from one area to another to complete unconnected missions that have got nothing to do with your objective. It is natural that when you have got a long journey, you get to meet people along the way that will help or need your help. This is what Origins manages to execute perfectly. Despite being committed to completing his task of taking revenge against those who have wronged him, Bayek is also not reluctant to assist those in need. It’s undeniable that this new setting has a sense of life in it. Ancient Egypt is the purest setting ever to be presented in the game. Ubisoft has done a great job when it comes to presentation and it will take a blind man to deny that.

I guess I have done enough ass kissing when it comes to the game setting. Now I will dive into the frustrating part; Gameplay. This has been the weakest point of Assassin’s Creed. Well, to justify their struggle, it is not a simple task to make an equal triangular setting (open environment, gameplay and graphics) without the excelling side perverting the other. The problem with such a triangular setting is that when the game excels on one side, it stretches the corner, therefore, misbalancing the other sides. Ubisoft has tried to tackle this issue for years but they are still behind. During the 30-hour play of the story, you will explore just about half of the map. The latter demonstrates how big and alluring the game environment is. Lamentably, a number of technical hiccups, as well as bugs pop up to derange the experience flow. Upon playing the game on Xbox One X, on several occasions, I experienced texture pop-in, dips in framerate amid cutscenes, as well as gameplay, and unusual issues related to graphics when interacting with other characters or exploring. The sad news is that these issues persist throughout the game, therefore, pulling down the supposedly amazing setting. Although combat has been greatly improved as I found myself leaping through the air while on slow-motion aim, things are quick to go south when the number of enemies is increased. Despite doing a stellar job in improving the combat, it seems like it is only enjoyable for more intimate battles where you get to face one or two enemies. It is hard to keep track of what’s going on around you when enemies are increased as the camera moves in awkwardly. The controls get unresponsive when this happens making it difficult to rely on deliberate movement. To make matters worse, this bumbling clumsiness spills over to stealth mode making it to a greater extent a nuisance than it is worth.

Despite reaching greater heights compared to its predecessors, Assassin’s Creed Origins often gets ruined by issues that drag the whole experience down. Inconsistent experience can hugely be credited to technical issues that haunt the game throughout. With all that said, Origins is still the best to be developed by Ubisoft thanks to its fresh, as well as exciting setting and a compelling story.

Leave a Reply